United Way of Lake County Launches COVID-19 Relief Fund

United Way of Lake County Launches COVID-19 Relief Fund

United Way of Lake County, Lake County Government, Lake County Community Foundation, and the Lake County Municipal League have joined together to create the Lake County COVID-19 Community Response Fund.

Hosted and administered by United Way of Lake County, the Lake County COVID-19 Community Response Fund will support local nonprofit organizations serving Lake County’s most vulnerable neighbors. The fund unites monies raised by Lake County philanthropies, corporations, and individuals to be disbursed to nonprofit organizations serving on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, providing urgent resources for Lake County most at-risk neighbors.

“We know how important our nonprofit agencies are to the people of Lake County. They are there for all of us, particularly our most vulnerable, every day and especially in times of crisis. By giving to this fund, we ensure that the volunteers and experts remain on the front line, protecting our residents and providing critical services.” said Lake County Board Chair Sandy Hart.

Grant funding will focus on critical needs, such as food security and basic supplies, rental and utility assistance, access to health care and prescriptions, and emerging emergency needs identified real time through the 211 information and referral helpline.

“We have never known a time more important than now to come together to support the critical needs of Lake County,” said Kristi Long, President and CEO of United Way of Lake County. “The COVID-19 Community Response Fund was created to move resources quickly and provide much needed support for local nonprofit social services organizations addressing the community’s greatest needs during this challenging time.”

Donations to the Lake County COVID-19 Community Response Fund can be made by visiting LIVEUNITEDlakecounty.org/covid19. To pay by check, make checks payable to United Way of Lake County and note “COVID-19 Community Response Fund”, 330 S. Greenleaf Street, Gurnee, IL 60031.

ABOUT UNITED WAY OF LAKE COUNTY

United Way of Lake County’s mission is to unite leadership and resources to create lasting change that will improve lives in Lake County, Illinois. United Way recently launched 211, a free, confidential, 24-hour information and referral helpline, providing personalized help guiding individuals and families in Lake County to available health and human services.

Through the support of our partners and supporters, we are transforming communities by delivering programs and services that are timely, effective and scalable, with results we can measure. For more information, visit LIVEUNITEDlakecounty.org.

Important Info For Lake County Businesses Affected by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Important Info For Lake County Businesses Affected by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Attention small businesses in Lake County who are affected by the recent Coronavirus precautions.

If you have or anticipate financial losses as a result of the pandemic or the response to the pandemic, you may be eligible for emergency disaster funding through the Small Business Administration, as ordered by the President of the United States.

Here is a link to a form, provided by the SBA, to fill out so that Illinois and Lake County can be opened up to receive emergency funding.

This is just the first step of the process. More information from the SBA will be forthcoming once Illinois and Lake County have been opened up for the disaster relief.

Tip:  Where it asks for an end date to the hardship, just put a date somewhat out into the future.  The SBA is well aware this is not yet known.

 

Again, here is the link:

Out of Abundance of Caution Lake County Implements Disaster Proclamation To Open Up Federal and State Resources

Out of Abundance of Caution Lake County Implements Disaster Proclamation To Open Up Federal and State Resources

The Lake County Board Chair, Sandy Hart, signed a disaster proclamation on March 13, 2020, a proactive measure that will allow Lake County to access additional state and federal funding and resources for coronavirus (COVID-19) response efforts. The proclamation follows a recommendation by the Lake County Board of Health at its March 12 executive board meeting, as well as a request by some Members of the Board on March 11.

On Wednesday, four Board Members, Dick Barr of Round Lake Beach, Michael Danforth of Barrington, Michael Rummel of Lake Forest and Diane Hewitt of Waukegan issued a statement requesting a heightened response to the pandemic virus that saw it’s first case in Lake County this week.

Citing data that shows adding “Social Distancing” to the recommended response can slow the hyperbolic increase in the disease’s spread, limit the demand on health care facilities and reduce fatalities, Barr called for the County to “lead by example”, calling for a heightened response to protect our residents and businesses of Lake County, and implementing a policy of Social Distancing. “We have evidence going back to the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918 that shows Social Distancing can drastically limit and slow the spread of a disease,” said Barr.

The proclamation is a procedural step that will ensure the County is able to access the resources, equipment and personnel needed to address changing circumstances. This is particularly necessary should the number of COVID-19 cases rise and the demands on County staff and partners continue to increase.

“I strongly support  the proclamation”, said Barr. “This [proclamation ] will allow us to open up avenues of financial support from the state and the federal government.  I have been talking closely with the White House and Small Business Administration to identify how we can get not just healthcare help, but also help for our local, small businesses who have been struggling in the wake of the outbreak.”

All Lake County government offices currently remain open, and Lake County has a contingency planning team in place that is closely monitoring the fast-changing COVID-19 situation. To ensure the safety of the community and Lake County government staff, Lake County will be following the guidelines issued by the Lake County Health Department to minimize COVID-19 spread. This includes:

  • Postponing and canceling large-scale events
  • Considering the cancellation of upcoming public meetings, including Lake County Board Committee meetings
  • Encouraging social distancing in the workplace
  • Exploring teleworking options for Lake County government staff
  • Limiting non-essential work travel

“Our highest priority is to ensure the health and safety of Lake County employees and their families, and residents,” said County Administrator Gary Gibson. “This is a dynamic situation, and our staff is working tirelessly to stay up to date with the most current information and make informed decisions to minimize the spread of COVID-19.”

Everyone has a role to play in getting ready and staying healthy. Residents are recommended to practice social distancing and follow new guidelines issued by the Lake County Health Department:

  • Community events of 250 people or more should be canceled or postponed until May 1. This includes personal and social events, and those with large spectator crowds, such as concerts and sporting events
  • For events with less than 250 people, residents should closely consider who is likely to attend the event and, if it includes vulnerable populations, strongly consider cancelling. Vulnerable populations include older adults and people of all ages with serious chronic health conditions, such as heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes
  • Residents should use good judgment about attending events in their own communities
  • View the complete guidelines issued by the Lake County Health Department

Residents also should remember the 3 C’s – clean, cover, and contain to prevent the spread of illness.

Clean

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects

Cover

  • Cover cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash
  • If no tissue is available, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands

Contain

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick

The Lake County Board and Health Department are closely monitoring the fast-changing outbreak of COVID-19 and will continue to post updates at lakecountyil.gov/coronavirus. Residents are also encouraged to sign up for the Lake County Health Department’s COVID-19 newsletter.

For general questions about COVID-19, call the Illinois Department of Public Health hotline at 1-800-889-3931 or email dph.sick@illinois.gov.

Lake County Health Department Issues New Guidance to Minimize COVID-19 Spread

Lake County Health Department Issues New Guidance to Minimize COVID-19 Spread

Lake County, Ill. — Following the leadership of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and State of Illinois, the Lake County Health Department is issuing new recommendations to slow community spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). These recommendations include community interventions such as cancelling large events and social distancing, which are measures to reduce social contact to help prevent the spread of illness while minimizing disruption to people’s lives.

“We want to reassure residents that currently, there is no evidence of community transmission of COVID-19 in Lake County. We do, however, expect to see more cases of COVID-19 in our communities,” said Lisa Kritz, Director of Prevention for the Lake County Health Department. “Our priority is protecting the health and safety of all who live, work, and play in Lake County, and we are taking an aggressive approach to mitigate the impact of COVID-19. By acting now, we all can help prevent illness and protect one another.”

“We recognize each of our communities is unique and jurisdictions need to consider tailoring their mitigation strategies to their characteristics and population,” said Tim Sashko, Lake County Board of Health President. “However, these new recommendations provide common-sense steps every community can take now to reduce the spread of COVID-19.”

In agreement with the State of Illinois and the CDC’s Mitigation Strategies for Communities, and in close collaboration with the Lake County Government, the Lake County Health Department is issuing the following guidance:

Community Events

  • Community events of 250 people or more should be cancelled or postponed until May 1. This includes personal and social events, and those with large spectator crowds, such as concerts and sporting events.
  • For events less than 250 people, residents should closely consider who is likely to attend the event and, if it includes vulnerable populations, strongly consider cancelling. Vulnerable populations include older adults and people of all ages with serious chronic health conditions, such as heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes.
  • Residents should use good judgment about attending events in their own communities.

Schools

  • At this time, the Lake County Health Department does not recommend school cancellation. The decision to cancel will be determined by individual school districts. School administrators and faculty should make responsible decisions, guided by recommendations from the CDC and the State, in the best interest of the health and safety of their students and families. Please refer to the CDC’s Considerations for School Closure guide.
  • Schools should not hold large assemblies or sporting events with 250 or more attendees.
  • Schools should consider other social distancing practices such as restricting access to school buildings to essential personnel, limiting field trips and inter-school interactions, staggering schedules to reduce mixing (e.g., stagger recess, entry/dismissal times), and should plan for digital and distance learning.
  • The Lake County Health Department has shared additional evidence-based recommendations directly with school district superintendents.

Businesses and Workplaces

  • Businesses should take advantage of teleworking capabilities. Every business that can have employees work remotely should consider doing so immediately.
  • For businesses that cannot have employees work remotely, employers should take proper precautions to keep individuals safe in the workplace. Remind staff to stay home when sick, consider a plan for teleworking where feasible, remain flexible on leave policies, and promote robust mitigation approaches such as thorough hand washing, cleaning, and offering hand sanitizer.

Vulnerable Populations

Early information out of China, where COVID-19 first started, shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness. This includes older adults and people of all ages with serious chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes.

  • Individuals who fall into these categories should avoid crowds, limit close contact with others, and wash your hands often to further reduce your risk of being exposed.
  • Avoid cruise travel and non-essential air travel.
  • Long-term care facilities in Lake County should implement measures following the guidance of the Illinois Department of Aging Immediate AAA Guidance on Congregate Settings, and Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) Long-Term Care Facilities Guidance to protect their residents.

“Our Health Department has a dedicated team of staff working night and day to protect the health of our residents,” said Tim Sashko. “We ask all people to prepare and stay healthy. Continue using everyday preventive actions—washing hands frequently, disinfecting commonly touched surfaces, covering coughs and sneezes, staying home when you are sick, and avoiding contact with sick people.”

Visit www.lakecountyil.gov/coronavirus for updates on COVID-19 in Lake County and to sign up for the Lake County Health Department’s COVID-19 email newsletter.

Utilize the IDPH COVID-19 hotline and website to have any questions answered or to report a suspected case: call 1-800-889-3931, email dph.sick@illinois.gov, or visit IDPH.illinois.gov.

19th Judicial Circuit to Remain Open, However Takes Steps to Limit Number of People Entering Courthouse

19th Judicial Circuit to Remain Open, However Takes Steps to Limit Number of People Entering Courthouse

The Nineteenth Judicial Circuit in Lake County is open and will continue to monitor state and local responses to the coronavirus and will follow guidance provided by state and local public health agencies and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Out of an abundance of caution and in an effort to be proactive, the Chief Judge has directed that the following steps will be taken to reduce the number of people entering the courthouse.

Employees and Facility:

All employees have been encouraged to wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; avoid touching their eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands; stay home when sick; avoid close contact with people who are sick; and clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects.
Facility crews are conducting regular cleanings with an emphasis on first-touch areas such as doors knobs and areas inside elevators and restrooms.
Jury Service:

There is a plan to limit the number of jurors called for service.
If you are summoned for jury service and are experiencing any acute respiratory illness symptoms (cough, shortness of breath, headaches), flu-like symptoms, have a fever, or are coughing or sneezing, contact the jury office on weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. at 847-377-4600 to defer your service to a later date. These are standard procedures but especially important at this time.
Expansion of Remote Court Appearances:

Attorneys or litigants that are unable to be present in courtrooms hearing Civil and Family matters (except Orders of Protection) may be able to appear remotely through use of CourtCall telephonic service. To schedule your appearance through CourtCall, call 1-888-882-6878 or email assist@CourtCall.com
If you have questions about remote appearances, contact the Court Administration Office at 847-377-3600
Courthouse Tours and Educational Events:

All scheduled courthouse tours, trainings and educational events are canceled until further notice.
Adult and Juvenile Probation, Juvenile Detention:

Probation and Detention remain open.
A plan has been implemented to limit in-person contacts and suspension of certain large group meetings.
Certain treatment related group meetings will be relocated to larger areas to accommodate social distancing.
Probationers who are feeling sick or have had contact with someone who has the coronavirus should contact their probation officer. Probation clients should also contact their probation officer if they have any questions about their next appointment.
Implementation of additional screening measures during intake process to identify individuals that may be experiencing symptoms, or had exposure to others, related to COVID-19.
Implementation of remote visitation procedures for persons held at the detention center or FACE-IT residential program.
Law Library and Kids’ Korner:

Both facilities are open to the public and are fully operational.
If you are experiencing any acute respiratory illness symptoms (cough, shortness of breath, headaches), flu-like symptoms, have a fever, or are coughing or sneezing, please do not visit the Law Library.
If a child is at all symptomatic, they will not be admitted into Kids’ Korner.
These are precautionary measures only. The health and welfare of all employees and courthouse users is our priority. As more information becomes available or if there are changes to court operations, we will advise.

Several County Board Members Call For Increased Response In Wake of 1st Confirmed Coronavirus Case in Lake County

Several County Board Members Call For Increased Response In Wake of 1st Confirmed Coronavirus Case in Lake County

Lake County Board Member Dick Barr, a Republican from Round Lake Beach is calling on his colleagues on the Lake County Board to join him in requesting additional measures be taken immediately to heighten the County’s response to the spreading Coronavirus, now that a Lake County case has been identified.

Citing data that shows adding “Social Distancing” to the recommended response can slow the hyperbolic increase in the disease’s spread, limit the demand on health care facilities and reduce fatalities, Barr is calling for the County to “lead by example” by implementing a policy of Social Distancing. “We have evidence going back to the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918 that shows Social Distancing can drastically limit and slow the spread of a disease,” said Barr.

The CDC defines social distancing as remaining out of congregate settings, avoiding mass gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.

Barr said, “Data shows that cases in the U.S. are doubling every two days. With a long incubation period and evidence that the virus can be spread before symptoms show, it is very likely that more cases exist that we don’t know about yet.”

Lake County Board Member, Michael Danforth, a Barrington Republican, who is also an attorney practicing in Lake County, agrees with Barr. “Our courts have hundreds of people coming in and out, exposing themselves and others to possible spread of a known virus,” said Danforth.

He added, “Our judges, employees, officers, attorneys and the general public are being somewhat forced to be in close quarters, in small, enclosed spaces, which is probably the number one way for a virus to spread.  We need to investigate options that would add video and teleconferencing for simple matters that don’t necessarily require in person appearances.”

Barr said, he is by no means calling for a panicked, overresponse, yet a measured and reasonable call to limit events that attract large gatherings of people in an attempt to proactively prevent the spread of the virus, which can be fatal to vulnerable populations, specifically elderly and those with compromised immune systems. “Even though the recovery rate is extremely high, over 97%, I believe this is an important step to protecting our entire community from a virus that we still know very little about, and do not yet have a vaccine for”, said Barr.

County Board Member, Mike Rummel, a Lake Forest Republican said, “I questioned whether we should be cancelling our public meetings for the time being since I saw information from insurance companies discouraging gatherings in excess of 20 people in confined spaces.” He added, “I think we need to immediately look at technology options to allow for meetings without putting the public or our staff at risk, so we can maintain continuity of Government for the residents of Lake County.”

County Board Member Diane Hewitt, a Democrat from Waukegan agrees, “we need to act in the best interest of our residents, immediately, for the sake of their health and well-being. I join my colleagues in requesting a stronger response to the current pandemic, as identified by the CDC, sooner than later.”

Barr said he participated in a CDC briefing today put on by the White House, where the recommendation was made to consider rearranging large activities and gatherings, in addition to the current recommendations of the Three C’s: Clean Cover and Contain. “I am asking all governments to consider cancelling or postponing large gatherings to help slow the spread of the virus.”

211 Lake County – Dick Barr

211 Lake County – Dick Barr

On January 21, 2020, Lake County Board Member and Round Lake Beach Mayor Richard Hill sat down to discuss Lake County Government. This excerpt deals with the new service being offered by Lake County called 211. 211 is a service residents can use to obtain help for just about any issue they can imagine. From getting help with an abusive relationship, to finding shelter, to helping with unpaid utility bills. 211 works similar to 911, in that you dial 211 on your phone to get connected with professional help. Do not use 211 for pressing emergencies, still use 911 for that.

 

Contact Your State & Federal Representatives RE: Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions in Lake County

Contact Your State & Federal Representatives RE: Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions in Lake County

Last year it was made public that Ethylene Oxide is classified as a carcinogen.
 
Per the U.S. Department of Labor: Ethylene oxide (EtO) is produced in large volumes and is primarily used as an intermediate in the production of several industrial chemicals, the most notable of which is ethylene glycol. It is also used as a fumigant in certain agricultural products and as a sterilant for medical equipment and supplies. Unfortunately, EtO possesses several physical and health hazards that merit special attention. EtO is both flammable and highly reactive. Acute exposures to EtO gas may result in respiratory irritation and lung injury, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, shortness of breath, and cyanosis. Chronic exposure has been associated with the occurrence of cancer, reproductive effects, mutagenic changes, neurotoxicity, and sensitization.
 
The group, Stop EtO in Lake County has been lobbying hard to stop the use of ETO in Lake County. Their efforts have resulted in Lake County taking the necessary step of testing for EtO releases into the atmosphere from two manufacturing plants in Lake County that utilize the gas.
 
The testing is still ongoing, but the preliminary readings and results have indicated there are emissions of EtO that far exceed the allowable emission levels, by as much as 25 to 50 times in certain locations at certain times of day, with certain wind patterns.
 
Lake County has no authority to do anything about this other than to educate you and lobby our State and Federal representatives on your behalf, because the power to make changes lies in the hands of state and federal EPA. The Sterigenics facility in Willowbrook was closed down this year due to high levels of emissions, but no such action has been taken here in Lake County to address the high emissions.
 
If this is a concern for you, please feel free to check out Stop EtO in Lake County, or participate in their rally this Friday at 6:30. Their leaders and members have been very forthcoming with information. They will also help you to figure out how you can contact your representatives to demand action.
 
Disclaimer: I am not a scientist by any means. My information is being passed on as a citizen who is concerned that a gas that has been linked to rare cancers, disproportionately affecting women and children, is being released into the air that Lake County breathes.  It is not my intent to cause needless alarm, however after reviewing the test results supplied by the Lake County Health Department, I am very concerned for my Lake County neighbors and residents and I will be contacting my State and Federal Representatives demanding actions be taken to make Lake County safe.  I hope you do the same. 

 

Click Here to view EtO Emissions Testing Results in Lake County.

Click Here to find out who your State and Federal Representatives are. 

Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions Testing Results Lake County

Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions Testing Results Lake County

Recent Updates

July 24, 2019 Update: Additional air monitoring results received

Both Medline and Vantage have conducted independent air monitoring during the month of June, some of which was done at sites also being monitored by the Health Department, the Village of Gurnee and the City of Waukegan. We have received one set of results from Medline, which can be viewed here:

Medline air monitoring results

We expect results from Vantage soon, and as the become available they will be posted here:

Vantage air monitoring results

July 22, 2019 Update: Additional air monitoring results received

The Health Department has received additional air monitoring results from samples collected on five separate days from June 14 to June 22, 2019 in Lake County.

June 21, 2019 Update: Initial air monitoring results received

The Health Department has received initial air monitoring results from samples collected on three separate days from June 6 to June 10, 2019 in Lake County. This initial data represents only three days of sampling, so conclusions about potential impacts to health cannot yet be made. The Health Department is sharing all results with the Village of Gurnee, City of Waukegan, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) as the data becomes available. Updates will be provided to the public on this web page.

Please note that on certain days, not all monitoring locations are sampled. These days were randomly selected during the 30-day period. Samples collected on these days are in addition to the samples collected on the regularly scheduled days. On these random days, four monitoring sites are being sampled.

PRESS RELEASE: Initial Ethylene Oxide Air Monitoring Results Received

Updated July 22, 2019

Notes on sample results table:

  1. ND (No detect) = EtO was not detected at a level above the method detection limit of approximately 0.045 μg/m3
  2. Invalid = The test could not be conducted due to a failure of the sampling device
    Site # Location Sample Dates Measured Air Concentration
    μg/m3 ppb
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.12 0.068
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.15 0.082
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.21 0.12
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.14 0.076
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.27 0.15
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.19 0.11
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 0.21 0.11
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 0.12 0.068
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 6.8 3.8
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 0.15 0.081
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 7 – 8, 2019 0.11 0.062
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 7 – 8, 2019 0.61 0.34
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 7 – 8, 2019 0.18 0.1
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 7 – 8, 2019 10 5.6
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.13 0.07
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.11 0.062
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.17 0.093
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.14 0.079
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.12 0.068
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.13 0.07
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 0.21 0.12
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 0.15 0.081
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 2.4 1.3
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 0.28 0.16
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.095 0.053
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.12 0.065
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.19 0.11
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.19 0.11
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.24 0.13
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.32 0.18
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.60 0.33
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.31 0.17
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.43 0.24
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.41 0.23
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 14 – 15, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 14 – 15, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 14 – 15, 2019 4.31 2.39
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 14 – 15, 2019 ND ND
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 0.16 0.0896
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 1.10 0.608
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 2.06 1.14
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 0.14 0.077
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 1.24 0.686
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 Invalid Invalid
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 17 – 18, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 17 – 18, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 17 – 18, 2019 ND ND
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 17 – 18, 2019 5.38 2.98
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 17 – 18, 2019 5.8 3.2
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 1.28 0.708
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 0.23 0.13
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 0.24 0.135
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 3.16 1.75
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 0.5 0.277
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 0.89 0.495
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 5.56 3.08
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 <0.072 <0.040

Lake County Air Monitoring Wind Rose Maps

The maps posted below show the monitoring locations, air monitoring results by day, and a wind rose, which shows the wind information for each sampling day (i.e., wind direction, intensity, and percentage of time wind was blowing from the direction indicated).

Note: With the assistance of US EPA and Illinois EPA, we are currently reviewing the wind rose data regarding wind intensity (speed). If it is determined that corrections are required, they will be posted to this site, along with an explanation.

Wind roses are very important in determining the potential impact of a source of pollution. For more information, please see the U.S. EPA’s How to Read a Wind Rose (PDF).

Lake County Air Monitoring Lab Reports

Note: In the samples report ERG Jun 14_22 eto, samples from Jun 21 – 22, 2019 indicate a “sampled” date of June 22, 2019. The convention has been to report the date the sampling began as the “sampled” date. A corrected report will be posted soon, indicating the “sampled” date as June 21, 2019.

https://www.lakecountyil.gov/4193/Vantage-Independent-EtO-Monitoring

Lake County Health Committee Passes Changes to Ordinance To Protect Animals

Lake County Health Committee Passes Changes to Ordinance To Protect Animals

Thank you to the Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center , Lake County Animal Care & Control , Go Humane Lake County and representatives of the Breeder Community for working together to come up with a common sense compromise that solidifies rights of legitimate breeders while strengthening humane protections for our fur baby population in Lake County.

A resolution passed committee today, unanimously, that will enforce fines and punishment on breeders guilty of inhumane conditions or cruelty to animals.

This goes to the full board for a vote in a couple weeks.

Here is the text from the HCS Agenda for the proposed modifications.

  • 7.3 19-1208 Ordinance amending the Lake County Code of Ordinances Chapter 172 – Animals.
    • The proposed revisions to 172.12 (B) contain requirements when the owner of a dog that has been declared animal-aggressive (when it has killed or seriously injured another owned animal) wants to give away or sell the dog or move to another jurisdiction.
    • The proposed revisions would require an owner to notify Animal Care and Control prior to transferring custody of the dog so that a disposition letter can be provided to the new owner identifying the responsibilities needed to meet requirements.
    • The proposed revisions would also require an owner to notify Animal Care and Control in both the jurisdiction to which he or she is moving, and the jurisdiction he or she is leaving. These revisions are modeled after similar requirements in the Illinois Animal Control Act for an owner of a dog that has been declared vicious (when it has killed or seriously injured a person).
  • The proposed revisions to Section 172.15 are to discourage irresponsible breeding of dogs and cats.
    • The Illinois Department of Agriculture (IDOA) licenses and regulates the breeding of dogs and cats, but only when the breeder has more than five breeding female
      animals.
    • In chapter 172, the current pet limit restriction for residences is four dogs and four cats; however, it only applies to pets older than 6 months.
      In unincorporated Lake County, zoning and property use restrictions prohibit “regular” use of a property for breeding and selling pets, but that standard is difficult to establish and prove. Thus, the existing regulations leave a gap in regulating and discouraging irresponsible “backyard breeding.”
    • The proposed revisions provide enforcement authority against irresponsible breeders, specifically those that maintain and treat their animals poorly.
    • The proposed revisions state that if a person is cited by an Animal Control Officer for failing to properly care for their animals (such as poor conditions, lack of food/water/shelter, failure to provide vet care, or cruelty), and the Officer finds that the person’s animal has offspring present (i.e., is breeding them), the exemption for dogs or cats six months or younger would no longer
      apply, and all animals would be counted toward the pet limit.
    • In addition to the care/treatment violations, the person could be cited for violating the pet limit for each dog or cat above the limit. The person could
      be cited a $100 fine per dog or cat, including those six months or younger, for violating the pet limit. Animal Care and Control would receive and pursue
      these cases on a complaint-driven basis.