Out of Abundance of Caution Lake County Implements Disaster Proclamation To Open Up Federal and State Resources

Out of Abundance of Caution Lake County Implements Disaster Proclamation To Open Up Federal and State Resources

The Lake County Board Chair, Sandy Hart, signed a disaster proclamation on March 13, 2020, a proactive measure that will allow Lake County to access additional state and federal funding and resources for coronavirus (COVID-19) response efforts. The proclamation follows a recommendation by the Lake County Board of Health at its March 12 executive board meeting, as well as a request by some Members of the Board on March 11.

On Wednesday, four Board Members, Dick Barr of Round Lake Beach, Michael Danforth of Barrington, Michael Rummel of Lake Forest and Diane Hewitt of Waukegan issued a statement requesting a heightened response to the pandemic virus that saw it’s first case in Lake County this week.

Citing data that shows adding “Social Distancing” to the recommended response can slow the hyperbolic increase in the disease’s spread, limit the demand on health care facilities and reduce fatalities, Barr called for the County to “lead by example”, calling for a heightened response to protect our residents and businesses of Lake County, and implementing a policy of Social Distancing. “We have evidence going back to the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918 that shows Social Distancing can drastically limit and slow the spread of a disease,” said Barr.

The proclamation is a procedural step that will ensure the County is able to access the resources, equipment and personnel needed to address changing circumstances. This is particularly necessary should the number of COVID-19 cases rise and the demands on County staff and partners continue to increase.

“I strongly support  the proclamation”, said Barr. “This [proclamation ] will allow us to open up avenues of financial support from the state and the federal government.  I have been talking closely with the White House and Small Business Administration to identify how we can get not just healthcare help, but also help for our local, small businesses who have been struggling in the wake of the outbreak.”

All Lake County government offices currently remain open, and Lake County has a contingency planning team in place that is closely monitoring the fast-changing COVID-19 situation. To ensure the safety of the community and Lake County government staff, Lake County will be following the guidelines issued by the Lake County Health Department to minimize COVID-19 spread. This includes:

  • Postponing and canceling large-scale events
  • Considering the cancellation of upcoming public meetings, including Lake County Board Committee meetings
  • Encouraging social distancing in the workplace
  • Exploring teleworking options for Lake County government staff
  • Limiting non-essential work travel

“Our highest priority is to ensure the health and safety of Lake County employees and their families, and residents,” said County Administrator Gary Gibson. “This is a dynamic situation, and our staff is working tirelessly to stay up to date with the most current information and make informed decisions to minimize the spread of COVID-19.”

Everyone has a role to play in getting ready and staying healthy. Residents are recommended to practice social distancing and follow new guidelines issued by the Lake County Health Department:

  • Community events of 250 people or more should be canceled or postponed until May 1. This includes personal and social events, and those with large spectator crowds, such as concerts and sporting events
  • For events with less than 250 people, residents should closely consider who is likely to attend the event and, if it includes vulnerable populations, strongly consider cancelling. Vulnerable populations include older adults and people of all ages with serious chronic health conditions, such as heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes
  • Residents should use good judgment about attending events in their own communities
  • View the complete guidelines issued by the Lake County Health Department

Residents also should remember the 3 C’s – clean, cover, and contain to prevent the spread of illness.

Clean

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects

Cover

  • Cover cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash
  • If no tissue is available, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands

Contain

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick

The Lake County Board and Health Department are closely monitoring the fast-changing outbreak of COVID-19 and will continue to post updates at lakecountyil.gov/coronavirus. Residents are also encouraged to sign up for the Lake County Health Department’s COVID-19 newsletter.

For general questions about COVID-19, call the Illinois Department of Public Health hotline at 1-800-889-3931 or email dph.sick@illinois.gov.

Property Taxes in Lake County, Dick Barr Argues For Lowering – Video

At the full Board Meeting of The lake County Board on Tuesday, September 10, 2019, County Board Member Dick Barr made an impassioned plea for the necessity of lowering property taxes. Citing that property taxes have never been lowered in at least 20 years, as far back as his data goes. Barr presented data going back to 2020 showing major decreases in new business development (90%), as well as the County’s Property Tax Levy increasing by 100% in that same time frame.

A resolution to increase the 2020 levy by $605,000 was presented to the Board to vote on.  Barr attempted to amend the resolution to freeze the levy, which would have provided tax savings to existing tax payers, albeit slight. He argues that while the savings are small, it is necessary to start a trajectory in the right direction.

Barr’s amendment failed to get the 11 votes necessary to pass.  6 Board Members voted in favor of Barr’s amendment, including Republicans Michael Danforth, Judy Martini, Brent Paxton, Ann Maine, and one Democrat, Diane Hewitt.

Keep up to date on Lake County issues at Dick’s Facebook Page www.Facebook.com/DickBarrLakeCounty 

Please Support My “No Growth 2020 Property Tax Levy” Amendment

Please Support My “No Growth 2020 Property Tax Levy” Amendment

The County Board will be voting on an estimated 2020 Property Tax Levy (amount collected in property taxes) tomorrow (September 10th) at the full board meeting at 9 AM on the 10th Floor of the Lake County Administration Building at 18 N County St in Waukegan.

I will be proposing an amendment to the resolution to freeze the levy at the 2019 amount, opting to not increase the levy with new growth.  Instead, the new growth will be used to reduce the existing tax base portion of the levy, however slight.

Watch the video the explains the Levy and my reasons for proposing an amendment.

My reasons are many:

  • Primarily, I am very concerned that new growth tax revenue in Lake County has declined by 90% since 2020, from $6 Million in 2000 to $605 Thousand projected in 2020.
  • The Lake County property tax levy has increased 100% since 2000, from $80 Million in 2000 to the current $162 Million. Even when adjusted for inflation that number has risen from $125 Million in 2000 to the current $162 Million, an increase of 30%.
  • Lake County will be receiving additional revenue from the state next year, partly due to increased transportation revenue from the State’s Motor Fuel Tax (estimated between $5-7 Million a year), and Lake County will also receive sales tax revenue from any marijuana retail that goes anywhere in the County, including within municipalities. (I am not currently aware of any projections or estimates on marijuana tax)
  • Cuts to services are not necessary to accomplish what I am asking, although during the budget process over the coming months I will be looking very closely to areas where cuts are warranted.
  • Lake County Government has not lowered its levy going back at least 20 years (as far back as my data goes). This is an opportunity to show residents that we care about the current trajectory of Property Taxes, and are committed to reversing that trajectory for the first time in decades.
  • Every $48 of property tax affects home equity by about $1,000. $480 of property tax affects about $10k in home equity and $4,800 in property tax affects about $100,000 in equity.  This is because lenders approve mortgage borrowers based on their monthly debt to income ratio taking property taxes into account.
  • While my proposal will mean very little on the individual tax bills, I hope its effect will be example setting and educational so that residents can ask the same of other taxing bodies that make up the 95% of the tax bill that County Government does not control.
  • Property Tax Payers have been investing in maintenance and infrastructure to make new development growth possible, but under the current system of not using new development growth to lower property taxes, residents never earn a return on their investment.

Thank you again for the opportunity to serve you.  Please let me know if you have any questions at all!

Lake County Property Tax Appeals

Lake County Property Tax Appeals

Appeal Process

The Lake County Board of Review & Appeal Process
The Lake County Board of Review has the authority to raise, lower or sustain property assessments as appears just. The typical appellant before the Board is a property owner who is dissatisfied with the assessment on a Lake County property.

Prior to filing a formal appeal to the Board, the Board strongly encourages property owners to visit their local township assessor’s office to discuss their concerns. In two types of appeals, those based on a “Factual Error” (such as incorrect square footage of a lot or improvement) and “Vacancy” of an income-producing commercial property, the Board actually requires that the local township assessor’s office be contacted first. Often the reason for an assessment can be made clear or an issue resolved at the local assessor’s office without going before the Board.

Filing an Appeal
For those cases which cannot be settled at the local township assessor’s office, the Board accepts appeals which meet criteria delineated here and discussed in Section III of the Board’s Rules: The appellant must have standing with the Board, must use and complete the prescribed forms of the Board, attach required evidence and submit one copy in a timely fashion – i.e., on or before thirty (30) days after the date of publication of current assessments for a particular township.

It is important to follow the Board’s rules regarding the filing of an appeal. If the criteria are not met, the Board will not schedule a hearing for the case, the Board will not render a decision and the appellant will have forfeited the right to further appeal the current assessment of a subject property.

The Board of Review has a comprehensive online appeal filing application available for the filing of assessment appeals. Comparable sales and assessments can be researched through this application. The Lake County Comparable Property Grid is available in the application and can be uploaded to the Board of Review. The application can accept the upload of documents from recent sales transactions and ad valorem appraisal documents as well.

Appellants choose the basis of their appeals and the form of hearing they prefer.

Reasons to Appeal
The typical bases or reasons for appeals are:

  • The assessment of a subject property is based on a factual error (e.g., incorrect square footage).
  • The assessment is greater than 1/3rd of the subject property’s recent sale price.
  • The assessment is greater than 1/3rd of the subject property’s market value.
  • The assessment of the subject property is higher than that of comparable properties.
  • Matters of law.

The type of evidence required by the Board for each basis or reason for an appeal is specified on the Appeal (application) Form and discussed in Section IV of the Board’s Rules.

Hearing Type
Appellants also may choose the form of hearing for their case. A hearing can be by letter, phone or in person, respectively options “1,” “2” and “3” on the Appeal (application) Form. If by letter, the Board decides the case on the basis of the written evidence submitted by the appellant and local township assessor’s office. The appeal by letter is the easiest form of appeal, because the appellant (and any representative and/or witness) does not need to remember to call nor travel to the Board on a designated date and time.

While any appeal may be heard by letter, two kinds of residential appeals accompanied by required written evidence are particularly well-suited for review by letter. One kind is an appeal based on a Subject Property’s Recent Sale Price and accompanied by a signed Settlement Statement or signed HUD-1, MLS listing history and the recorded Illinois Real Estate Transfer Declaration (PTAX-203). These documents typically are among the closing documents for the sale of a subject property or are available from the real estate broker involved in the transaction. (See the Board’s Rules, Section IV B, for further information.) The second kind of appeal that is well-suited for review by letter, is based on Fair Cash Value and accompanied by an ad valorem appraisal of a subject property, valuing the subject property as of the lien date (January 1st) of the current assessment year. (See the Board’s Rules, Section IVC, for further details.) Aside from the above mentioned instances, any well prepared case based upon comparable properties can also handled by the Board of Review without a hearing.

If the hearing is by phone or in person, the hearing begins with the swearing-in of parties to the case. Appellants and/or their attorney give evidence and testimony. The Township Assessor’s Office presents evidence and testimony. The Board and parties may ask questions. Parties to the case may provide rebuttal testimony. Board members deliberate between or among themselves and render their decision. Hearings are scheduled every fifteen (15) minutes.

Conclusion
The Appeal (application) Form, the Board’s Rules and this website are designed to be instructive. However, for those property owners who have additional questions or concerns, the Chief County Assessment Office conducts Tax Assessment Help Centers throughout the County during the appeal application time periods. In addition, the Chief County Assessment office has taxpayer advocates available each business day that can assist taxpayers with their assessment and appeal process questions.

Board of Review Forms

2019 Rules of the Board of Review (PDF)

2019 Rules of the Board of Review – Spanish (PDF)–Coming Soon

2019 Residential Appeal–Available soon in Smartfile

2019 Commercial/Industrial Appeal–Available soon in Smartfile

2019 Commercial Income/Expense Worksheet (PDF)
This form works best using Internet Explorer, or by downloading and saving a copy to the computer.

2019 Board of Review Vacancy Affidavit (PDF)

Commercial/Industrial Comparison Grid (PDF)

Attorney E-Filing Registration Form (Online Form)

Request to Intervene in Appeal Proceeding (Smartfile)

Click Here to view filing deadlines on the County’s Chief County Assessor’s Office Website.

Click Here to view the Hearing Schedules on the County’s CCAO Website

The Board of Review has made some changes to their rules and procedures for assessment appeal hearings. One misconception is that a property owner would need to have an attorney to file an assessment appeal. Can a taxpayer still file an assessment appeal?

Yes, in nearly all instances a taxpayer can file the assessment appeal without the assistance of an attorney. The county provides a tremendous amount of property assessment related information on the CCAO website. The Board of Review has tools that can be used for searching for comparable property information and completing forms on the office website. Corporations and limited liability companies will need to utilize an attorney in the assessment appeal for their properties. 

Is an attorney the only professional that can represent a party at the Board of Review?

Yes, this is true. In Illinois an attorney is the only professional that can represent a party in a judicial or quasi-judicial setting like the Board of Review process (705 ILCS 205/1).

I have sought the assistance of a real estate broker when I have gone through the assessment appeal process in recent years. How can these types of licensed professionals help me in an assessment appeal with the Lake County Board of Review?

Illinois licensed real estate brokers, real estate appraisers, accountants, and other professionals may assist you with the preparation of case evidence and testify at hearings before the Board of Review as expert witnesses. These professionals cannot represent a taxpayer at a hearing or file an assessment appeal cases on behalf of any party seeking relief from the Lake County Board of Review.

Those not qualified to practice law in the State of Illinois may not appear at hearings before the Board in a representative capacity and may not conduct questioning, cross-examination or other investigations at the hearing. Non-attorneys may not testify at a hearing without the taxpayer or the taxpayer’s attorney. In the instance where an appeal is filed by a non-attorney agent, the materials provided will be returned to the agent. Filing deadlines will not be extended for appellants who utilize non-attorney agents.

Can I e-file my assessment appeal with the Board of Review?

Online filing of appeals  in Lake County. The online filing application allows for the uploading of evidence such as the Lake County Comparable Property Grid, an ad valorem appraisal and a legal brief. For cases regarding the recent sale of a subject property, the online application requires answering a series of questions about the transaction and allows for the upload of a HUD-1 or Settlement Statement. Filers will receive an email confirmation that their case has been submitted within one business day of the filing being completed.

It is important to note that the online appeal application depends upon the successful operation of many electronic systems, each beyond the control of the Board of Review. Lake County cannot guarantee the availability of the online application, and the Board highly recommends appellants not wait until a filing deadline to submit their appeals online. Filing deadlines are fixed and not extended if, for some reason, the online application is unavailable.

How should I go about evaluating my property assessment valuation?

We recommended these steps to review your assessment valuation:
1. Review all of the information on the assessment notice.
2. Visit assessor.lakecountyil.gov to review assessment information including property characteristics, comparable property information, and the e-filing process.
3. Discuss any questions on your assessment value or property information with your township assessor’s office.
4. If an assessment appeal is in order, prepare evidence by using the Lake County Comparable Grid, and other materials such as appraisals, or sales documents.
5. Complete and submit an assessment appeal using the Smartfile e-filing system and with supporting evidence to the Board of Review by the prescribed deadline.
6. You can attend the hearing in person, by telephone, or submit case materials and ask the Board of Review to decide the case based on the evidence provided. Most cases can be resolved without in-person or telephone hearing. Particularly cases based upon a recent purchase of a subject property, or those based upon an appraisal provided by an Illinois licensed provider.

How does an assessment appeal hearing work?

At the outset of a hearing the parties to a case are sworn in, appeal hearings are conducted in the following manner: The appellant presents testimony regarding the assessment and answers any questions from the Board. Next, the Township Assessor or a representative from his/her office is expected to be present to give evidence and testimony concerning the property and its assessment. The appellant then presents rebuttal to Assessor remarks. This concludes the evidentiary portion of the hearing. Board Members then deliberate, considering the evidence, testimony and rebuttal, and announce their decision at the close of the hearing. Hearings are scheduled at 15 minute intervals.

What website tools exist to help me with an assessment appeal?
• Comparable Search (available soon) – allows the taxpayer to review their property information, search for comparable properties and complete the Lake County Comparable Property Grid.
• Online Appeal Filing Application – the appellant can e-file their assessment appeal and various documents pertinent to an assessment appeal case.
• Lake County Maps Online – aerial photography and map making ability.

Are there any ways a taxpayer can get assistance with their assessment value related questions?
• Have a conversation with your elected township assessor’s office. Generally these offices want to hear from taxpayers or have them stop in to get their property tax assessment valuation questions answered.

• Talk to a Taxpayer Advocate with the Chief County Assessment Office Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. by calling 847.377.2050, or visiting the office at: 18 N County St., 7th Floor, Waukegan.
• Attend a Tax Assessment Help Center to receive one-on-one assistance from the Chief County Assessment Office.

• Utilize all of the web tools and resources at the Chief County Assessment Office and Board of Review websites.

If I provided appropriate evidence, can my township assessor adjust my assessment after it is published and noticed?

Yes, the township assessor’s office has the ability to modify the assessment value after the assessment notice has been mailed. The assessor can request a valuation change be approved by the Board of Review. These value change requests of an assessor are submitted to the Board of Review electronically.

If I have recently purchased my home and my assessment valuation reflects a market value higher than my purchase price, what can I do?

Generally, this is the most straight forward type of assessment related circumstance. We would suggest that you take information on your purchase and discuss your assessment valuation with your township assessor’s office. Assessors can recommend a change in your assessment valuation to the Board of Review which will eliminate the need to file an assessment appeal.

If you find that your township assessor’s office is unable to make a recommendation to the Board of Review, you will need to file an assessment appeal. In this instance, you will want to provide a copy of the HUD-1 closing document, the PTAX-203 Illinois Transfer Declaration, or any other proof that the sale was advertised and was an arms-length transaction. There is no need to have representation at the Board of Review in this type of circumstance. Often, the Board of Review resolves these types of assessment appeals without a formal hearing.

Is a real estate appraisal a good piece of evidence?

Generally, one of the best pieces of evidence is a real estate appraisal, done for ad valorem property taxation purposes, with a valuation date of January 1, 2019. This is an appraisal that would have been done to determine the value of a property as of the tax lien date (January 1).

Many people have appraisals that have been done for refinancing purposes. These documents can be good evidence of value as well and the Board of Review does accept these documents as evidence.

It is important to understand the scope and purpose of an appraisal that is done for financing can be different than an appraisal that is done for ad valorem taxation purposes. The date of value, time period of comparable sales data and other different lender requirements can significantly affect the value conclusion.

Real estate appraisal is not an exact science. The Board understands that real estate appraisals are educated opinions of value. It is common for value opinions and adjustments to differ from one appraisal professional to another. It should also be understood that in these cases it is common for the township assessor’s office to provide additional market value evidence. The Board of Review will review the appraisal report provided and the assessor evidence to determine an appropriate property tax assessment value for the subject property.

Click Here to file an online appeal at the County’s CCAO website. This will only be active during the open appeal periods.

Contact Your State & Federal Representatives RE: Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions in Lake County

Contact Your State & Federal Representatives RE: Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions in Lake County

Last year it was made public that Ethylene Oxide is classified as a carcinogen.
 
Per the U.S. Department of Labor: Ethylene oxide (EtO) is produced in large volumes and is primarily used as an intermediate in the production of several industrial chemicals, the most notable of which is ethylene glycol. It is also used as a fumigant in certain agricultural products and as a sterilant for medical equipment and supplies. Unfortunately, EtO possesses several physical and health hazards that merit special attention. EtO is both flammable and highly reactive. Acute exposures to EtO gas may result in respiratory irritation and lung injury, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, shortness of breath, and cyanosis. Chronic exposure has been associated with the occurrence of cancer, reproductive effects, mutagenic changes, neurotoxicity, and sensitization.
 
The group, Stop EtO in Lake County has been lobbying hard to stop the use of ETO in Lake County. Their efforts have resulted in Lake County taking the necessary step of testing for EtO releases into the atmosphere from two manufacturing plants in Lake County that utilize the gas.
 
The testing is still ongoing, but the preliminary readings and results have indicated there are emissions of EtO that far exceed the allowable emission levels, by as much as 25 to 50 times in certain locations at certain times of day, with certain wind patterns.
 
Lake County has no authority to do anything about this other than to educate you and lobby our State and Federal representatives on your behalf, because the power to make changes lies in the hands of state and federal EPA. The Sterigenics facility in Willowbrook was closed down this year due to high levels of emissions, but no such action has been taken here in Lake County to address the high emissions.
 
If this is a concern for you, please feel free to check out Stop EtO in Lake County, or participate in their rally this Friday at 6:30. Their leaders and members have been very forthcoming with information. They will also help you to figure out how you can contact your representatives to demand action.
 
Disclaimer: I am not a scientist by any means. My information is being passed on as a citizen who is concerned that a gas that has been linked to rare cancers, disproportionately affecting women and children, is being released into the air that Lake County breathes.  It is not my intent to cause needless alarm, however after reviewing the test results supplied by the Lake County Health Department, I am very concerned for my Lake County neighbors and residents and I will be contacting my State and Federal Representatives demanding actions be taken to make Lake County safe.  I hope you do the same. 

 

Click Here to view EtO Emissions Testing Results in Lake County.

Click Here to find out who your State and Federal Representatives are. 

Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions Testing Results Lake County

Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions Testing Results Lake County

Recent Updates

July 24, 2019 Update: Additional air monitoring results received

Both Medline and Vantage have conducted independent air monitoring during the month of June, some of which was done at sites also being monitored by the Health Department, the Village of Gurnee and the City of Waukegan. We have received one set of results from Medline, which can be viewed here:

Medline air monitoring results

We expect results from Vantage soon, and as the become available they will be posted here:

Vantage air monitoring results

July 22, 2019 Update: Additional air monitoring results received

The Health Department has received additional air monitoring results from samples collected on five separate days from June 14 to June 22, 2019 in Lake County.

June 21, 2019 Update: Initial air monitoring results received

The Health Department has received initial air monitoring results from samples collected on three separate days from June 6 to June 10, 2019 in Lake County. This initial data represents only three days of sampling, so conclusions about potential impacts to health cannot yet be made. The Health Department is sharing all results with the Village of Gurnee, City of Waukegan, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) as the data becomes available. Updates will be provided to the public on this web page.

Please note that on certain days, not all monitoring locations are sampled. These days were randomly selected during the 30-day period. Samples collected on these days are in addition to the samples collected on the regularly scheduled days. On these random days, four monitoring sites are being sampled.

PRESS RELEASE: Initial Ethylene Oxide Air Monitoring Results Received

Updated July 22, 2019

Notes on sample results table:

  1. ND (No detect) = EtO was not detected at a level above the method detection limit of approximately 0.045 μg/m3
  2. Invalid = The test could not be conducted due to a failure of the sampling device
    Site # Location Sample Dates Measured Air Concentration
    μg/m3 ppb
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.12 0.068
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.15 0.082
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.21 0.12
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.14 0.076
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.27 0.15
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.19 0.11
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 0.21 0.11
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 0.12 0.068
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 6.8 3.8
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 0.15 0.081
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 7 – 8, 2019 0.11 0.062
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 7 – 8, 2019 0.61 0.34
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 7 – 8, 2019 0.18 0.1
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 7 – 8, 2019 10 5.6
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.13 0.07
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.11 0.062
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.17 0.093
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.14 0.079
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.12 0.068
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.13 0.07
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 0.21 0.12
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 0.15 0.081
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 2.4 1.3
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 0.28 0.16
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.095 0.053
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.12 0.065
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.19 0.11
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.19 0.11
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.24 0.13
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.32 0.18
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.60 0.33
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.31 0.17
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.43 0.24
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.41 0.23
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 14 – 15, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 14 – 15, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 14 – 15, 2019 4.31 2.39
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 14 – 15, 2019 ND ND
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 0.16 0.0896
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 1.10 0.608
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 2.06 1.14
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 0.14 0.077
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 1.24 0.686
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 Invalid Invalid
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 17 – 18, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 17 – 18, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 17 – 18, 2019 ND ND
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 17 – 18, 2019 5.38 2.98
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 17 – 18, 2019 5.8 3.2
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 1.28 0.708
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 0.23 0.13
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 0.24 0.135
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 3.16 1.75
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 0.5 0.277
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 0.89 0.495
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 5.56 3.08
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 <0.072 <0.040

Lake County Air Monitoring Wind Rose Maps

The maps posted below show the monitoring locations, air monitoring results by day, and a wind rose, which shows the wind information for each sampling day (i.e., wind direction, intensity, and percentage of time wind was blowing from the direction indicated).

Note: With the assistance of US EPA and Illinois EPA, we are currently reviewing the wind rose data regarding wind intensity (speed). If it is determined that corrections are required, they will be posted to this site, along with an explanation.

Wind roses are very important in determining the potential impact of a source of pollution. For more information, please see the U.S. EPA’s How to Read a Wind Rose (PDF).

Lake County Air Monitoring Lab Reports

Note: In the samples report ERG Jun 14_22 eto, samples from Jun 21 – 22, 2019 indicate a “sampled” date of June 22, 2019. The convention has been to report the date the sampling began as the “sampled” date. A corrected report will be posted soon, indicating the “sampled” date as June 21, 2019.

https://www.lakecountyil.gov/4193/Vantage-Independent-EtO-Monitoring

Lake County Health Committee Passes Changes to Ordinance To Protect Animals

Lake County Health Committee Passes Changes to Ordinance To Protect Animals

Thank you to the Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center , Lake County Animal Care & Control , Go Humane Lake County and representatives of the Breeder Community for working together to come up with a common sense compromise that solidifies rights of legitimate breeders while strengthening humane protections for our fur baby population in Lake County.

A resolution passed committee today, unanimously, that will enforce fines and punishment on breeders guilty of inhumane conditions or cruelty to animals.

This goes to the full board for a vote in a couple weeks.

Here is the text from the HCS Agenda for the proposed modifications.

  • 7.3 19-1208 Ordinance amending the Lake County Code of Ordinances Chapter 172 – Animals.
    • The proposed revisions to 172.12 (B) contain requirements when the owner of a dog that has been declared animal-aggressive (when it has killed or seriously injured another owned animal) wants to give away or sell the dog or move to another jurisdiction.
    • The proposed revisions would require an owner to notify Animal Care and Control prior to transferring custody of the dog so that a disposition letter can be provided to the new owner identifying the responsibilities needed to meet requirements.
    • The proposed revisions would also require an owner to notify Animal Care and Control in both the jurisdiction to which he or she is moving, and the jurisdiction he or she is leaving. These revisions are modeled after similar requirements in the Illinois Animal Control Act for an owner of a dog that has been declared vicious (when it has killed or seriously injured a person).
  • The proposed revisions to Section 172.15 are to discourage irresponsible breeding of dogs and cats.
    • The Illinois Department of Agriculture (IDOA) licenses and regulates the breeding of dogs and cats, but only when the breeder has more than five breeding female
      animals.
    • In chapter 172, the current pet limit restriction for residences is four dogs and four cats; however, it only applies to pets older than 6 months.
      In unincorporated Lake County, zoning and property use restrictions prohibit “regular” use of a property for breeding and selling pets, but that standard is difficult to establish and prove. Thus, the existing regulations leave a gap in regulating and discouraging irresponsible “backyard breeding.”
    • The proposed revisions provide enforcement authority against irresponsible breeders, specifically those that maintain and treat their animals poorly.
    • The proposed revisions state that if a person is cited by an Animal Control Officer for failing to properly care for their animals (such as poor conditions, lack of food/water/shelter, failure to provide vet care, or cruelty), and the Officer finds that the person’s animal has offspring present (i.e., is breeding them), the exemption for dogs or cats six months or younger would no longer
      apply, and all animals would be counted toward the pet limit.
    • In addition to the care/treatment violations, the person could be cited for violating the pet limit for each dog or cat above the limit. The person could
      be cited a $100 fine per dog or cat, including those six months or younger, for violating the pet limit. Animal Care and Control would receive and pursue
      these cases on a complaint-driven basis.