Property Tax Levy Explained

We all know what our property taxes are, but how many have ever explained what they mean? In this video, I go into great depth to explain exactly how the Lake County Government Property Tax levy works and how it affects your tax bill.

Property Tax and the Property Tax levy are some of the more difficult ideas to understand in Government. In this video you will know what a levy is, how it is decided, and how new property development affects the levy and size of spending in a taxing body.

For more information and videos, visit our Facebook Page at www.facebook.com/dickbarrlakecounty

 

Property Tax Going Up?

Quadrennial Reassessments

Every four years Illinois Counties reassess every single property on the tax roles for the purpose of levying Property Taxes. Cook County reassesses properties every three years.

2019 is the quadrennial reassessment year for Lake County. Invariably, there will be winners and losers, as some properties have seen significant increases in value since the last quadrennial reassessment in 2015. Homes like Condos and townhomes have seen the largest value increases since 2015.  Condo and townhome owners may be in for some unpleasant surprises on their 2020 tax bills.  On the flip side, homes that already increased in value prior to the last reassessment may see some tax relief from the 2019 quadrennial reassessment.  Homes in the $250k+ range mostly fall into this category. This is because their assessments already accounted for their higher values, and that segment of the market has seen some softening in recent years.

Why does property tax go up even if property values go down?

Why do property taxes always go up even when my home values go down? This is a more complicated concept that I discuss at length in the video. Spoiler alert: It has to do with the fact that your value doesn’t truly determine your property taxes, more specifically, your value compared to the value of others’ homes is what determines your property tax.

What will your tax bill look like in 2020? Will your property taxes be going up again? This video goes in depth to understand your property taxes in their entirety, using very easy to understand analogies and explanations.

Questions?

If you have more questions or you would like more information after watching the video, please feel free to reach out to me anytime.  Stay up to date on what’s happening in Lake County by “liking” me on Facebook. My official page on Facebook is https://www.facebook.com/DICKBARRLAKECOUNTY/  You can also sign up for my newsletter by clicking here:

If you would like more information on Property taxes, please visit my property tax information page here:

 

Opioid Overdose Deaths Drop For 1st Time in a Decade

Opioid Overdose Deaths Drop For 1st Time in a Decade

Drug overdose deaths in the United States declined by about 5% between December 2017 and December 2018, according to preliminary CDC data.

In a decade that saw a meteoric rise in opioid related deaths, this news is a welcome change.  However, while opioid related deaths are down, other “designer” drug overdoses are on the rise. The reduction in opioid deaths have been linked to reductions in opioid prescriptions and the prevalence of the use of drugs like Naloxone that the first responders have been trained on administering to overdose victims, which immediately revives the body during an overdose.

In 2018, the number of predicted drug overdose deaths was 68,557, indicating a 5.1% drop from the predicted count in December 2017, according to the 12 month-ending count data. However, these numbers may be underreported due to incomplete data.

These numbers indicate the first drop in drug overdose deaths in decades; however, these provisional counts may be slightly different from the final drug overdose death data, which will be available in a few months through the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics.

The most recent final data from the National Vital Statistics System revealed that there were 70,237 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. in 2017. According to the data, the age-adjusted rate of drug overdose deaths was 9.6% higher in 2017 than the rate in 2016 (21.7 vs. 19.8 per 100,000) and the age-adjusted rate of drug overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids like fentanyl, fentanyl analogs, and tramadol increased by 45%. – by Savannah Demko

References:

CDC. Drug Overdose Deaths in the United States, 1999-2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db329.htm. Accessed July 17, 2019.

CDC. National Center for Health Statistics. Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm#ref8. Accessed July 17, 2019.

LC Board Members Attend State Leadership Day at White House in DC

LC Board Members Attend State Leadership Day at White House in DC

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Last week, Lake County Board Members, Dick Barr, Judy Martini, and Michael Danforth joined roughly 100 County Leaders from Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and Michigan at the White House in Washington, D.C. for State Leadership Day to discuss the programs and opportunities available to local Governments to help their respective communities. Participants met with senior members of the Trump administration and Vice President, Mike Pence, on key issues like flooding, small business and economic development, the opioid and substance abuse epidemic, and revitalizing American infrastructure.

“As the requirements of our communities are growing at unprecedented rates, it is becoming increasingly important to network with our Federal partners in Washington to help address our local issues,” said Dick Barr, a Round Lake Beach Republican Member of the County Board. “Lake County needs Billions of dollars’ worth of improved infrastructure that no gas tax in Lake County will even begin to touch. Federal involvement is imperative to the future of our residents if we wish to find a way to keep residents and businesses wanting to stay in our County,” Barr added. “The senior level contacts we made in Washington will be immensely valuable to the people we serve in Lake County.”

Elected officials spent the day listening to reports and opportunities made available by the Administration for the Department of Agriculture, Army Corp of Engineers, Small Business Administration, FEMA, Department of Transportation, Department of Education, Office of National Drug Control Policy, Office of American Innovation and the White House Opportunity and Revitalization Council.

“I’ve talked with many Officials who are making use of a Federal lobbyist to get access to much needed grant revenue from the Federal Government to tackle the more difficult projects,” said Judy Martini, Republican Board Member from Fox Lake. “A small investment could spell millions in additional funding opportunities.”

“Having these conversations face to face and learning about these opportunities can make a very big impact for Lake County. The Chain of Lakes, which represents about $100 Million in annual tourism, is experiencing major detrimental effects from flooding, erosion and sedimentation which will have an increasing negative effect on the residents and tourists who live and play in Northwestern Lake County. We could make use of a Building Resilient Infrastructure & Communities (BRIC) grant to help the Chain be more resilient to changes that are affecting our environment.”

Michael Danforth, a Barrington Republican County Board Member, said, “Our property taxes in Lake County are out of control. While the Lake County Government represents only between 5-7% of a typical resident’s property tax bill, we are always looking for ways to leverage additional funding resources to help alleviate the property tax burden of our residents.” He added, “The resources we learned about and contacts we made will go a long way to help leverage better services for our residents without adding to what already amounts to one of the highest property tax burdens in the nation.”

Executive Director of the Illinois State Association of Counties (ISACO), Joe McCoy, who also attended the conference, said, “An effective partnership between the federal government and local officials is critically important. The White House conference provides a forum for county officials from Illinois to ask direct questions of administration officials about issues of importance to their counties. I was pleased to see
our county officials take advantage of this opportunity for constructive dialogue.”

In addition to the meeting at the White House, Lake County representatives also said they met with legislative staff for U.S. Congressman Brad Schneider and U.S. Senators Dick Durbin and Tammy Duckworth.

“While meeting with our Federal Representatives, we provided information strongly supporting reauthorization of the “FAST Act” through the bipartisan, “America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act,” as it provides federal infrastructure investments through 2025,” claimed Barr. “Additionally, we requested almost $25 Million in funding for a number of unfunded flood control projects, $9 Million for Public Works projects to
address our 70+ year average age piping infrastructure through the County, and requested fast action from the EPA on the assessment of data and presentation of results obtained from the recent Ethylene Oxide (EtO) testing performed in Lake County. We also requested additional funding for more EtO testing.”

The next step in the process is to take the information gathered and put it to good use.

“I am looking forward to meeting with the incredible staff at Lake County to go over my notes and share the information and contacts gathered during our trip to see which grants make sense for our circumstances and which grants can be effectively utilized to provide the biggest bang for our buck,” said Danforth.

Contact Your State & Federal Representatives RE: Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions in Lake County

Contact Your State & Federal Representatives RE: Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions in Lake County

Last year it was made public that Ethylene Oxide is classified as a carcinogen.
 
Per the U.S. Department of Labor: Ethylene oxide (EtO) is produced in large volumes and is primarily used as an intermediate in the production of several industrial chemicals, the most notable of which is ethylene glycol. It is also used as a fumigant in certain agricultural products and as a sterilant for medical equipment and supplies. Unfortunately, EtO possesses several physical and health hazards that merit special attention. EtO is both flammable and highly reactive. Acute exposures to EtO gas may result in respiratory irritation and lung injury, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, shortness of breath, and cyanosis. Chronic exposure has been associated with the occurrence of cancer, reproductive effects, mutagenic changes, neurotoxicity, and sensitization.
 
The group, Stop EtO in Lake County has been lobbying hard to stop the use of ETO in Lake County. Their efforts have resulted in Lake County taking the necessary step of testing for EtO releases into the atmosphere from two manufacturing plants in Lake County that utilize the gas.
 
The testing is still ongoing, but the preliminary readings and results have indicated there are emissions of EtO that far exceed the allowable emission levels, by as much as 25 to 50 times in certain locations at certain times of day, with certain wind patterns.
 
Lake County has no authority to do anything about this other than to educate you and lobby our State and Federal representatives on your behalf, because the power to make changes lies in the hands of state and federal EPA. The Sterigenics facility in Willowbrook was closed down this year due to high levels of emissions, but no such action has been taken here in Lake County to address the high emissions.
 
If this is a concern for you, please feel free to check out Stop EtO in Lake County, or participate in their rally this Friday at 6:30. Their leaders and members have been very forthcoming with information. They will also help you to figure out how you can contact your representatives to demand action.
 
Disclaimer: I am not a scientist by any means. My information is being passed on as a citizen who is concerned that a gas that has been linked to rare cancers, disproportionately affecting women and children, is being released into the air that Lake County breathes.  It is not my intent to cause needless alarm, however after reviewing the test results supplied by the Lake County Health Department, I am very concerned for my Lake County neighbors and residents and I will be contacting my State and Federal Representatives demanding actions be taken to make Lake County safe.  I hope you do the same. 

 

Click Here to view EtO Emissions Testing Results in Lake County.

Click Here to find out who your State and Federal Representatives are. 

Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions Testing Results Lake County

Ethylene Oxide (EtO) Emissions Testing Results Lake County

Recent Updates

July 24, 2019 Update: Additional air monitoring results received

Both Medline and Vantage have conducted independent air monitoring during the month of June, some of which was done at sites also being monitored by the Health Department, the Village of Gurnee and the City of Waukegan. We have received one set of results from Medline, which can be viewed here:

Medline air monitoring results

We expect results from Vantage soon, and as the become available they will be posted here:

Vantage air monitoring results

July 22, 2019 Update: Additional air monitoring results received

The Health Department has received additional air monitoring results from samples collected on five separate days from June 14 to June 22, 2019 in Lake County.

June 21, 2019 Update: Initial air monitoring results received

The Health Department has received initial air monitoring results from samples collected on three separate days from June 6 to June 10, 2019 in Lake County. This initial data represents only three days of sampling, so conclusions about potential impacts to health cannot yet be made. The Health Department is sharing all results with the Village of Gurnee, City of Waukegan, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) as the data becomes available. Updates will be provided to the public on this web page.

Please note that on certain days, not all monitoring locations are sampled. These days were randomly selected during the 30-day period. Samples collected on these days are in addition to the samples collected on the regularly scheduled days. On these random days, four monitoring sites are being sampled.

PRESS RELEASE: Initial Ethylene Oxide Air Monitoring Results Received

Updated July 22, 2019

Notes on sample results table:

  1. ND (No detect) = EtO was not detected at a level above the method detection limit of approximately 0.045 μg/m3
  2. Invalid = The test could not be conducted due to a failure of the sampling device
    Site # Location Sample Dates Measured Air Concentration
    μg/m3 ppb
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.12 0.068
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.15 0.082
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.21 0.12
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.14 0.076
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.27 0.15
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 6 – 7, 2019 0.19 0.11
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 0.21 0.11
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 0.12 0.068
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 6.8 3.8
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 6 – 7, 2019 0.15 0.081
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 7 – 8, 2019 0.11 0.062
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 7 – 8, 2019 0.61 0.34
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 7 – 8, 2019 0.18 0.1
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 7 – 8, 2019 10 5.6
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.13 0.07
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.11 0.062
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.17 0.093
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.14 0.079
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.12 0.068
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 9 – 10, 2019 0.13 0.07
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 0.21 0.12
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 0.15 0.081
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 2.4 1.3
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 9 – 10, 2019 0.28 0.16
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.095 0.053
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.12 0.065
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.19 0.11
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.19 0.11
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.24 0.13
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 12 – 13, 2019 0.32 0.18
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.60 0.33
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.31 0.17
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.43 0.24
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 12 – 13, 2019 0.41 0.23
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 14 – 15, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 14 – 15, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 14 – 15, 2019 4.31 2.39
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 14 – 15, 2019 ND ND
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 0.16 0.0896
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 1.10 0.608
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 2.06 1.14
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 0.14 0.077
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 ND ND
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 1.24 0.686
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 15 – 16, 2019 Invalid Invalid
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 17 – 18, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 17 – 18, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 17 – 18, 2019 ND ND
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 17 – 18, 2019 5.38 2.98
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 17 – 18, 2019 5.8 3.2
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 1.28 0.708
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 0.23 0.13
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 0.24 0.135
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 3.16 1.75
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 18 – 19, 2019 ND ND
    R1 O’Plaine Rd & Russell Ave, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 0.5 0.277
    R2 7000 Washington Street, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    V1 2000 Belle Plaine Ave, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 0.89 0.495
    V2 SE corner Northwestern and Keith, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    V3 3886 Morrison Drive, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    V4 1200 Estes Drive, Gurnee June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M1 SE corner of N. Palmieri and Staben, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M2 3106 Belvidere Road, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M3 Pulaski Road and S. Shields Drive, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 5.56 3.08
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 ND ND
    M4 FP access west of Green Bay Road, Waukegan June 21 – 22, 2019 <0.072 <0.040

Lake County Air Monitoring Wind Rose Maps

The maps posted below show the monitoring locations, air monitoring results by day, and a wind rose, which shows the wind information for each sampling day (i.e., wind direction, intensity, and percentage of time wind was blowing from the direction indicated).

Note: With the assistance of US EPA and Illinois EPA, we are currently reviewing the wind rose data regarding wind intensity (speed). If it is determined that corrections are required, they will be posted to this site, along with an explanation.

Wind roses are very important in determining the potential impact of a source of pollution. For more information, please see the U.S. EPA’s How to Read a Wind Rose (PDF).

Lake County Air Monitoring Lab Reports

Note: In the samples report ERG Jun 14_22 eto, samples from Jun 21 – 22, 2019 indicate a “sampled” date of June 22, 2019. The convention has been to report the date the sampling began as the “sampled” date. A corrected report will be posted soon, indicating the “sampled” date as June 21, 2019.

https://www.lakecountyil.gov/4193/Vantage-Independent-EtO-Monitoring

Lake County Health Committee Passes Changes to Ordinance To Protect Animals

Lake County Health Committee Passes Changes to Ordinance To Protect Animals

Thank you to the Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center , Lake County Animal Care & Control , Go Humane Lake County and representatives of the Breeder Community for working together to come up with a common sense compromise that solidifies rights of legitimate breeders while strengthening humane protections for our fur baby population in Lake County.

A resolution passed committee today, unanimously, that will enforce fines and punishment on breeders guilty of inhumane conditions or cruelty to animals.

This goes to the full board for a vote in a couple weeks.

Here is the text from the HCS Agenda for the proposed modifications.

  • 7.3 19-1208 Ordinance amending the Lake County Code of Ordinances Chapter 172 – Animals.
    • The proposed revisions to 172.12 (B) contain requirements when the owner of a dog that has been declared animal-aggressive (when it has killed or seriously injured another owned animal) wants to give away or sell the dog or move to another jurisdiction.
    • The proposed revisions would require an owner to notify Animal Care and Control prior to transferring custody of the dog so that a disposition letter can be provided to the new owner identifying the responsibilities needed to meet requirements.
    • The proposed revisions would also require an owner to notify Animal Care and Control in both the jurisdiction to which he or she is moving, and the jurisdiction he or she is leaving. These revisions are modeled after similar requirements in the Illinois Animal Control Act for an owner of a dog that has been declared vicious (when it has killed or seriously injured a person).
  • The proposed revisions to Section 172.15 are to discourage irresponsible breeding of dogs and cats.
    • The Illinois Department of Agriculture (IDOA) licenses and regulates the breeding of dogs and cats, but only when the breeder has more than five breeding female
      animals.
    • In chapter 172, the current pet limit restriction for residences is four dogs and four cats; however, it only applies to pets older than 6 months.
      In unincorporated Lake County, zoning and property use restrictions prohibit “regular” use of a property for breeding and selling pets, but that standard is difficult to establish and prove. Thus, the existing regulations leave a gap in regulating and discouraging irresponsible “backyard breeding.”
    • The proposed revisions provide enforcement authority against irresponsible breeders, specifically those that maintain and treat their animals poorly.
    • The proposed revisions state that if a person is cited by an Animal Control Officer for failing to properly care for their animals (such as poor conditions, lack of food/water/shelter, failure to provide vet care, or cruelty), and the Officer finds that the person’s animal has offspring present (i.e., is breeding them), the exemption for dogs or cats six months or younger would no longer
      apply, and all animals would be counted toward the pet limit.
    • In addition to the care/treatment violations, the person could be cited for violating the pet limit for each dog or cat above the limit. The person could
      be cited a $100 fine per dog or cat, including those six months or younger, for violating the pet limit. Animal Care and Control would receive and pursue
      these cases on a complaint-driven basis.
Lake County Board Eliminates Pension Contributions For Elected Members

Lake County Board Eliminates Pension Contributions For Elected Members

On Tuesday, January 15th, the Lake County Board, in its first regular session of its new term voted down a resolution that would have continued tax dollars funding pension contributions for County Board Members. The vote fell largely along party lines, with one Democrat voting with the Republicans to kill the resolution. One Member, Paul Frank of Highland Park was absent. The vote was 10 Members in favor of continuing Taxpayer funded pension contributions to 10 Members opposed to Taxpayer funded pension contributions. The rules of the Board require a majority of Members present to pass any vote. In the event of a tie, any vote fails.

On his Facebook page, newly elected Board Member, Dick Barr, had this to say:

I am very proud of what the County Board was able to accomplish today, which allowed me to fulfill a campaign promise.

We eliminated Taxpayer Funded Pension contributions for all County Board Members.”

Barr thanked his constituents who responded to his survey requesting their opinion on the matter. He indicated 94% of respondents opposed a continuation of Board Member pensions.

When it was realized by the Board the measure would likely fail, due to the absence of Member Frank, Member Bill Durkin of Highland Park made a motion to postpone the vote to a later date.  Immediately after the motion, Member Barr called a Point of Order to invoke a little known rule from Robert’s Rules of Order that had most of the room stumped, causing a recess to allow time for the Chair and Parlimentarian to review the invoked rule.

A motion to postpone is out of order when the date of the next regularly scheduled meeting passes a statutory time deadline. Further, no motion to postpone can be made to a special meeting that is not already on the calendar,” said Barr.

The failure of the motion to postpone caused a vote to be called and subsequently fail.

While this represents minimal savings, I consider this a huge win for the taxpayers, and hopefully a model of what all Governments should be looking at for part time elected officials,” said Barr.